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The Paradigm Shifters

February 01, 2022 12:00 AM
For BYU Homecoming each year, descendants of George H. Brimhall sponsor an essay contest honoring a BYU founder. The 2021 honored founder was longtime BYU Program Bureau director Janie Thompson. Below is an excerpt from the winning essay, by design major Shannon G. Spencer (’23).
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Stroll Through Paris at the MOA with "L'Affichomania: The Passion for French Posters"

September 01, 2021 12:00 AM
Take a walk back in time to turn-of-the-century France with this new MOA exhibi
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Arts & Comms: Behind the Cameras

August 24, 2021 12:00 AM
BYU CFAC alumni reflect on their return to campus for the Arts & Comms videos
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Dance of Recovery: Resilience and Healing Through Art

July 09, 2021 12:00 AM
In 2020 Eugene D. Tapahe (BFA ’92), a Diné (Navajo) web designer turned fine art photographer, was feeling distressed by the pandemic and an aunt’s death from the virus. Then one night he dreamt he was in Yellowstone National Park, sitting in tall grass and peacefully watching bison, when jingle-dress dancers came to the grass and danced, bringing him healing and hope. This dream inspired Tapahe to create Art Heals: The Jingle Dress Project, which encourages peace and resilience. See more at magazine.byu.edu and tapahephotography.com.
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Graphic Design Major Amanda Lund on Her Design Work, Inclusivity and Being a Voice for Others

April 09, 2021 12:00 AM
Amanda Lund’s time at BYU has given her a jump start on her future career. She has already had the opportunity to work with e.l.f. Cosmetics, where designs she helped create will be featured on shelves at Target stores. She is currently an intern for Javas Lehn Studios, a design firm based in New York City working for hotels and publications. Her attraction to art and design came during her freshman year when she took her first art class: Art 101. This three-hour course enthralled her and made her realize this was what she wanted to dedicate the rest of her life to, in some capacity or another. “The design program really pushes you to explore what you’re passionate about and use design to express that,” Lund said. Lund has taken those words to heart and has used her passion for design to guide her in other avenues of her education and life; thus leading her towards her drive for inclusivity in design. A lover of the outdoors and a helper at heart, Lund dedicated her capstone project – “Designing for Every Body, Not the Average Body” – to aiding those with disabilities. She wants them to be seen by the design world. “I focused specifically on those who live with physical disabilities and how the spaces we have designed reject them. These spaces were not designed with their needs in mind, but were designed for what society deems as the 'average' body. But I believe there is no average human,” said Lund. Her project zeroed in on how commercial parks and playgrounds tend to turn away people with physical limitations, especially those in wheelchairs. She praised Clemyjontri Park, a park from her hometown of McLean, VA designed for children with disabilities, as being the most popular kids’ park in the area. “When you design for people with disabilities, it suddenly becomes more accessible for everyone,” she said. Lund hopes to use her design skills to make the world a more inclusive place. She didn't understand that design was so much more than just creating beautiful brands and products that articulate a particular story. “I’ve learned that there is so much more to design. I now have the necessary tools to help give others a voice and ignite change in the world around me,” said Lund. Lund will receive her BFA in graphic design this spring and will continue the Javas Lehn internship after graduation. She looks forward to finding other endeavors that will develop her fervor for design and her voice for others.
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McCall Keller: BYU graduate, graphic design award winner, basketball enthusiast

September 21, 2020 12:00 AM
The Design Kids competition encourages young designers like McCall Keller to create new designs and show off their talents
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Design Student’s Museum Rebrand Named Finalist in Annual Competition

September 02, 2020 12:00 AM
A prestigious design magazine chose senior Hunter Young’s design as a finalist in their annual competition. BYU student Hunter Young is a finalist in the Communication Arts annual Design Competition. Young is in the Graphic Design Program of the Design Department. His piece, “OMSI,” will be featured in the magazine’s annual design edition. “OMSI”, named after the Oregon Museum of Science and Industry, is a rebranding project for the museum involving an interchangeable logo system. Young, who is from Portland, Oregon, said the OMSI had a big influence on him when he was growing up, and he wanted to rebrand it because it was due for a change. “I knew that I wanted to create a contemporary branding system that could remain flexible, since the museum has many departments and events,” Young said. “I think because I was working on something that was personal to me, it made the process a lot more fun because I cared about it and was focused on making it the best I could.” The project took about a semester to complete, with a lot of editing and adjusting. Even now, after it’s been submitted for and won a couple of different awards, Young said he is continually working to make the piece better. The Communication Arts Design Annual competition showcases winners from one of the most prestigious design competitions in the United States and throughout the world. Out of the 2,900 total entries, just 126 pieces were accepted as finalists. While Young had submitted his project for a different award, he didn’t know that his professors had submitted it for the Communication Arts competition, but he said he’s glad they did. “We really have such amazing design professors who are always looking out for you and wanting you to succeed, which I am so grateful for,” he said. “Without their help and encouragement, I probably would not have entered, thinking it was too far of a reach for me.” Young grew up reading Communication Arts magazine, which he said is a staple in the design world. When he learned that he was a finalist and that his design would be featured in the annual design magazine, he was beyond excited. “Being a finalist really means a lot. Above all it has motivated me to keep creating and pushing myself. To be a finalist alongside other designers and studios that I have looked up to for so long is an honor.” Young hopes to make a career out of design. He said he’s looked into other career paths, but in the end he always knew this is what he wanted to do. “I grew up in an environment that showed me not only the importance that art and design has, but that you can actually have a successful and fulfilling creative career, despite what many people might say,”
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Design Student Reflects on Winning Entry in National Competition

June 12, 2020 12:00 AM
Hansen’s winning piece “Scale the Globe with Help from the Gilman Scholarship” was chosen as one of 300 winners from 8,700 submissions
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BYU Photography Student Silvia Borja Announced as Winner of 2020 Photography Competition

May 19, 2020 12:00 AM
Borja’s winning piece “Fish Out of Water” was inspired by her experience adjusting to a new culture
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BFA Senior Morgan Shreenan Creates Project Focused on the Meaning of Color

May 11, 2020 12:00 AM
Shreenan’s project was inspired by a 2019 visit to the Color Factory Interactive Museum in New York City
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BYU Illustration Grad Shares Details About a Collaborative Project Focused on Jane Austen

May 11, 2020 12:00 AM
Lexi Nilson and two others created the book “Jane Was Here” using funds received from a Laycock Grant while students at BYU
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Dallin Jones on Animation, Filmmaking and 'Curing Souls' Through Art

April 06, 2020 12:00 AM
Jones — a native of Midland, Michigan — will graduate with a BFA in animation on April 24, 2020
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BYU Design professor Doug Thomas featured in BYU Magazine’s “A Thing of Beauty” Series

February 21, 2020 12:00 AM
Thomas discusses how typefaces are beautiful storytellers
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Four BYU Design Professors Claim Juror Award at the Design Arts Utah 2019 Exhibition

December 23, 2019 12:00 AM
Designers explain the thought process behind their project “Unity & Division”
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BYU Design Student Recognized by International Publication

March 04, 2019 12:00 AM
Each year, world-renowned publishing company Graphis Inc. recognizes the work of up-and-coming design students during their New Talent Annual. This year, they received 1160 submissions from around the world and chose to recognize 22 of the 25 projects sent in by BYU. Design major Todd McAllister was the only student from BYU — and one of just 21 students total — to walk away with the annual’s highest honor: the Platinum Award. “I was pretty surprised when I found out that I had won the award,” said McAllister. “It’s nice to get some validation after working hard on a project like that. There are a lot of great designers that submit to Graphis each year, so it was a significant personal achievement to win an award against such tough competition.” The designs that won McAllister the award were for Dwell Magazine. McAllister was tasked with re-designing the magazine’s current cover in a way that was aesthetically pleasing but still on-brand. McAllister’s approach to the project was centered on his love for clean, uncluttered design. “I seem to be drawn to simple, minimalistic design because it leaves me with a sense of awe or piques my interest somehow,” said McAllister. “The design direction was inspired by wanting to achieve that same feeling in a magazine cover.” McAllister said he isn’t sure exactly what set his designs apart from the rest of the competition, though his guess is that it was how well the designs paired photos and text. “In my opinion, a lot of beautiful cover photographs are ruined with really busy headlines and other text elements,” said McAllister. “I think that trying to reduce that as much as possible so the photos can speak for themselves might have set my designs apart from the rest.” While McAllister’s designs may have been simple, the creative process that led to the finished pieces was not. He repeatedly designed covers and critiqued them until he settled on three final designs. McAllister said his favorite part of working on the project was figuring out the title part of the design. “I had been through tons of iterations that didn’t seem to feel right, but something about the lowercase masthead placed vertically along the side of the cover seemed to click, and then things sort of fell into place from there,” said McAllister. His experience working on the designs and winning the award impacted McAllister in a lasting way. “I definitely think this experience will have a positive impact on my future career,” he said. “If nothing else, it has helped me feel a bit more confident in my abilities, which is pretty vital to creativity.” After graduation, McAllister doesn’t imagine his future as a concrete, five-year-plan type of journey. “My future career goals basically involve waking up everyday excited to work on whatever project I have,” said McAllister. “I guess I don’t really have a specific position or place I want to be in, I just want to be excited about the work that I’m doing while pushing the boundaries of what I’m able to do.” For now, McAllister and the other students who were honored by Graphis Inc. are waiting for their work to be published in the hardcover version of the New Talent Annual, which comes out May 1, 2019.
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BYU Design and Art Students Share Their Talents to Serve Homeless Youth

December 19, 2018 12:00 AM
BYU design and art students worked with Volunteers of America to serve homeless youth in Salt Lake City
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Design Students Improve Their Skills During Inktober Challenge

October 01, 2018 12:00 AM
BYU artists take on the Inktober challenge by doing one ink drawing a day for the entire month of October
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